Thomas A Edison SSBN-610 - History

Thomas A Edison SSBN-610 - History

Thomas A Edison SSBN-610

Thomas A. Edison
(SSBN-610: dp. 6,900 (surf.), 8,000 (subm.); 1. 410'; b. 33', dr. 32', s. 20+ k.; cpl. 110; a. 16 Poll, 4 21"tt.; cl. Ethan Allen)

Thomas A. Edison was laid down on 15 March 1960 at Groton, Conn., by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corp.; launched on 15 June 1961; sponsored by Mrs. Madeleine Edison Sloane; and commissioned on 10 March 1962, Capt. Charles M. Young (Blue crew) and Capt. Walter Dedrick (Gold crew) in command.

Following shakedown training off the eastern coast of the United States, Thomas A. Edison loaded Polaris missiles at Charleston, S.C., and embarked upon her first deterrent patrol on 7 November. She concluded that patrol at the base at Holy Loch, Scotland, whence she operated f or the next f our years and 17 deterrent patrols. In September 1966, her official home port was changed from New London, Conn., to Charleston, S.C. in preparation for her first major overhaul. She ended her 17th patrol at Charleston on 15 October 1966 and began her overhaul on the 28th. She completed repairs on 9 May 1968; and, after post-overhaul sea trials and shakedown, she embarked upon her 18th deterrent patrol on 22 September 1968. Over the next five years she operated out of New London and Rota, Spain, from which ports she conducted another 19 patrols in the Atlantic.

In June of 1973, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet, arriving in San Diego on 11 July. After a short period of operations with Submarine Group 5, she moved to Vallejo on 6 August to begin another overhaul, this time at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard. On 30 November 1974, the fleet ballistic missile submarine completed repairs and, following shakedown in January and February of 1975, she transited the Panama Canal again in March to fire test missiles near Cape Canaveral, Fla. She concluded that mission in July and retransited the canal on 8 August. Thomas A. Edison carried out operations along the west coast until December at which time she headed for her new home port, Guam. As of the beginning of 1980, the fleet ballistic missile submarine continued to conduct deterrent patrols from her base at Guam.


SSBN-610 was commissioned in 1959 and laid down at Electric Boat at the end of the year . After a construction period of well over a year it was launched and was christened Edison Sloane by Mrs. Madeleine. In March 1962 the Thomas A. Edison was put into service.

For the first few years of its career, the submarine operated from the Holy Loch base in Scotland the Edison only reached the United States again in 1966 when the first overhaul was due in the Charleston Naval Shipyard . Afterwards, from 1968, the boat moved back to Europe, her home port was Rota in Spain. From 1973 the boat was assigned to the Pacific Fleet, in the same year an overhaul and modernization of the missile complex took place in the Mare Island Naval Shipyard . Following the following test drives, the Edison was stationed in Apra Harbor , Guam .

In 1981, the missile complex was in agreement with SALT I disabled the boat went after that, especially in anti-submarine Exercises, more than hunting submarine SSN-610 . In November 1982, the boat collided while surfacing with the USS Leftwich (DD-984) , where she was badly damaged. The ship was examined in the United States Naval Base Subic Bay and finally drove back to the United States on the surface of the water. There the boat was no longer repaired, but officially decommissioned on December 1, 1983 and canceled until 1997 in the Ship-Submarine Recycling Program in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard .

The USS Thomas A. Edison was the only nuclear-powered missile submarine to carry a normal-sized Steinway piano for 22 years (1961–1983)


USS Thomas A. Edison (SSBN 610)

USS THOMAS A. EDISON was the third ETHAN ALLEN - class nuclear powered fleet ballistic missile submarine and the first ship in the Navy to bear the name.

After 18 years of service, the THOMAS A. EDISON was redesignated as SSN 610 to comply with the SALT I treaty on October 6, 1980, and concrete blocks were placed in the missile tubes to disable the submarine's missile launch capability. She served as an attack submarine (SSN) mainly doing exercises until she was decommissioned on December 1, 1983, and stricken from the Navy list on April 30, 1986. On October 1, 1996, the THOMAS A. EDISON entered the Navy's Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., which was completed on December 1, 1997.

General Characteristics: Awarded: July 1, 1959
Keel laid: March 15, 1960
Launched: June 15, 1961
Commissioned: March 10, 1962
Decommissioned: December 1, 1983
Builder: Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics, Groton, Conn.
Propulsion system: one S5W nuclear reactor
Propellers: one
Length: 410.4 feet (125.1 meters)
Beam: 33.1 feet (10.1 meters)
Draft: 29.9 feet (9.1 meters)
Displacement: approx. 7,900 tons submerged
Speed: Surfaced: 15 knots, Submerged: 20 knots
Armament: 16 vertical tubes for Polaris missiles, four 21" torpedo tubes
Crew: 12 Officers and 128 Enlisted (two crews)

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS THOMAS A. EDISON. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

Accidents aboard USS THOMAS A. EDISON:

About the Submarine's Name:

Thomas Alva Edison - born on 11 February 1847 in Milan, Ohio - grew up in Michigan. As a child, he was slow in school and very poor in mathematics, but excelled as a reader. Hard work became a characteristic feature of Edison's life at an early age as a teenager, he had already established a thriving business selling newspapers and candy on trains. In 1863, he became a telegraph operator and, in 1868, went to work for Western Union in Boston, Mass. Throughout that period, however, he also dabbled with chemistry and the application of electricity to telegraphy. He secured a patent to his first invention, an electrographic vote recorder, in 1869. That same year, Edison joined the Laws Gold Indicator Co. as general manager and soon established a partnership with two others in the electrical engineering consultation business. He sold his portion of the latter firm in 1870, and the profits therefrom allowed him to establish his own shop with a staff of assistants. In 1874, he made quadruplex telegraphy, the simultaneous transmission of four different messages, practicable and, the following year, developed a resonator for analyzing sound waves. In 1876, the year in which he moved his laboratory to Menlo Park, N.J., he perfected the carbon telephone transmitter. In 1877, Edison invented the phonograph - perhaps his greatest achievement from the standpoint of inventive ingenuity.

If one can regard the phonograph as Edison's greatest invention, the one for which he is best remembered, the incandescent lamp, was not his at all. The principle had been known since Sir Humphry Davy's experiments in 1802, and inventors had toyed with the idea through the first three quarters of the 19th century, hampered at first by the lack of a satisfactory source of electricity and later by the twin problems of short life and poor luminous output.

Later, in 1883, he made his only truly scientific contribution when he discovered the "Edison effect." He showed that his incandescent lamp could act as a valve admitting negative electricity but rejecting positive. Ironically, he abandoned the discovery because, as an inventor, he saw no practical use for it. Later, his find became the basis for the vacuum tube so important to the development of radio and television transmission and reception.

Edison moved his laboratory to West Orange, N.J., in 1887. In 1891, he invented a "kinetoscope," a device for showing photographs in rapid succession to give the illusion of a moving picture. It was not a motion picture projector in the modern sense, for it utilized neither projector nor screen. It remained for Thomas Armat to devise a machine capable of projecting a picture from film onto a screen in 1895. Edison only acquired the patent to Armat's invention and improved it. He also used the projector in the first commercial showing of motion pictures on 23 April 1896 in New York City. Seventeen years later, he demonstrated a method of synchronizing sound with motion pictures and laid the foundation for sound movies.

When World War I erupted, Edison began devoting a large portion of his talent to defense-oriented inventions. He developed substitutes for drugs, dyes, and other items that the United States had previously imported from blockaded Germany. He also worked on a process to make synthetic carbolic acid and other substances necessary for the manufacture of explosives. He headed the Navy's consultative board and conducted research on such things as torpedo mechanisms, flame throwers, and submarine periscopes. Following the war, he continued his experiments despite his age, looking for improvements in wireless telegraphy, radio, electric power, motion pictures, and even the automobile and airplane. In his eighties, Edison embarked upon the attempt to produce synthetic rubber from domestic American plants. While so engaged, he collapsed in his laboratory on 1 August 1931 and died several weeks later on 18 October.

History of USS THOMAS A. EDISON:

USS THOMAS A. EDISON was laid down on 15 March 1960 at Groton, Conn., by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corp. launched on 15 June 1961 sponsored by Mrs. Madeleine Edison Sloane and commissioned on 10 March 1962, Capt. Charles M. Young (Blue crew) and Capt. Walter Dedrick (Gold crew) in command.

Following shakedown training off the eastern coast of the United States, THOMAS A. EDISON loaded Polaris missiles at Charleston, S.C., and embarked upon her first deterrent patrol on 7 November. She concluded that patrol at the base at Holy Loch, Scotland, whence she operated for the next four years and 17 deterrent patrols. In September 1966, her official home port was changed from New London, Conn., to Charleston, S.C. in preparation for her first major overhaul. She ended her 17th patrol at Charleston on 15 October 1966 and began her overhaul on the 28th. She completed repairs on 9 May 1968 and, after post-overhaul sea trials and shakedown, she embarked upon her 18th deterrent patrol on 22 September 1968. Over the next five years, she operated out of New London and Rota, Spain, from which ports she conducted another 19 patrols in the Atlantic.

In June of 1973, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet, arriving in San Diego on 11 July. After a short period of operations with Submarine Group 5, she moved to Vallejo on 6 August to begin another overhaul, this time at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard. On 30 November 1974, the fleet ballistic missile submarine completed repairs and, following shakedown in January and February of 1975, she transited the Panama Canal again in March to fire test missiles near Cape Canaveral, Fla. She concluded that mission in July and retransited the canal on 8 August.

THOMAS A. EDISON carried out operations along the west coast until December at which time she headed for her new home port, Guam.

On October 6, 1980, the THOMAS A. EDISON was redesignated as SSN 610 to comply with the SALT I treaty and concrete blocks were placed in the missile tubes to disable the submarine's missile launch capability. She served as an attack submarine (SSN) mainly doing exercises until she was decommissioned on December 1, 1983, and stricken from the Navy list on April 30, 1986. On October 1, 1996, the THOMAS A. EDISON entered the Navy's Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., which was completed on December 1, 1997.


USS HUNLEY (AS-31)

The USS Hunley (AS-31) was launched 28 September 1961 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va. and commissioned 16 June 1962.

Hunley has the distinction of being the first ship designed and built up from the keel to service and maintain the U.S. Navy's nuclear powered Ballistic Missile Submarine Fleet. She had complete facilities for servicing the complex Polaris Weapons Systems and for accomplishing any submarine repair other than a major shipyard overhaul.

After a shakedown cruise and post shakedown yard availability, Hunley departed Norfolk on 29 December 1962 for Holy Loch, Scotland, arriving 9 January 1963. Almost immediately she began taking the load off Proteus. The first boat was the USS Thomas A. Edison (SSBN-610) returning from her first patrol.

Proteus was officially relieved 15 March 1963 as tender to Submarine Squadron 14 at Holy Loch, Scotland.

A Polaris milestone was reached in December 1965 when Thomas A. Edison came alongside to commence the 100th refit of an SSBN by Hunley. This signified that one hundred SSBN submarines had gone out on time from Hunley and not one of them had to make an early return from patrol. This represents some 200 months of Polaris on station or 16 1/2 years of submerged strategic deterrent since Hunley's arrival in Holy Loch 9 January 1963. Among impressive jobs carried out by Hunley is welding on SSBN pressure hulls or reactor plant fluid systems. Once unheard of in submarine tending, these jobs are only a few of many tackled with confidence and skill by Hunley. These and many other alterations are carried out as a matter of routine to keep SSBNs on the line with the newest possible technical improvements and safety devices. For example, an auxiliary "Sub-Safe" package was accomplished on Theodore Roosevelt in which over 40 fittings and more than 100 feet of new piping in a major system were installed. A battery replacement for Ethan Allen was completed In only 11 days. Hunley meets demands from making water-borne propeller replacements to encapsulation of AC induction motors delicate repairs to navigation and fire control, and many other varied tasks to insure that each SSBN has the finest of care on each refit. The resolution, can-do spirit, and persevering fidelity of her officers and men give firm allegiance to Hunley's motto: "We Serve to Preserve Peace." In late 1966 Hunley was relieved at Site One by the USS Simon Lake (AS-33).

From 1966 to 1981 Hunley served three tours at Site III in Guam, and three tours at Site IV in Charleston, as well as, completing a number of shipyard overhauls. Among the many modifications was the installation of new missile cranes, and a Poseidon missile conversion. For the period of 1 May through 1 Dec. of 1972, at Site III, Holland was awarded her first Meritorious Unit Commendation (MUC).

For the period of 18 Oct. 1978 through 1 June 1980, Hunley was awarded her second MUC for tending duties at Site III in Guam.

In January 1982 Hunley returned to the Holy Loch for the 2nd time, and relieved the USS Holland (AS-32). In June 1987 the Hunley was relieved at Site I by the USS Simon Lake (AS 33), and she got underway for Norfolk.

Hunley received her third MUC for tending fast attack submarines at U.S. East Coast ports from 1 August 1992 through 30 September 1994. During this period Hunley made a port visit to Cape Canaveral, and her last liberty port of call in Key West, Florida. Hunley was decommissioned on 30 September 1994.

For a more detailed history of HUNLEY go to: TENDER TALE

For additional images of HUNLEY and the Dunoon area go to: HUNLEY


On 9 April 1962, during shakedown training off the eastern coast of the United States, Thomas A. Edison collided with the destroyer USS Wadleigh (DD-689). [1]

Thomas A. Edison loaded Polaris missiles at Charleston, South Carolina, and embarked upon her first deterrent patrol on 7 November 1962. She concluded that patrol at the base at Holy Loch, Scotland, from which she operated for the next four years and conducted 17 deterrent patrols. In September 1966, her official home port was changed from New London, Connecticut, to Charleston, South Carolina, in preparation for her first major overhaul. She ended her 17th patrol at Charleston on 15 October 1966 and began her overhaul on 28 October 1966. She completed repairs on 9 May 1968 and, after post-overhaul sea trials and shakedown, she embarked upon her 18th deterrent patrol on 22 September 1968.

After a shortened 19th patrol, she conducted a "Follow On Target" (FOT) test launch. For this test, four missiles were selected at random, their warheads were removed, and telemetry packages were fitted in place of the warheads. Thomas A. Edison then proceeded to a location just off the Canary Islands and fired these missiles into the Caribbean. Due to the accuracy and timeliness of these successful launches, the members of that Blue Crew were awarded a Meritorious Unit Citation.

Through June 1973, Thomas A. Edison operated out of New London and Rota, Spain, from which ports she conducted another 19 deterrent patrols in the Mediterranean Sea.

In June 1973, she was transferred to the United States Pacific Fleet, arriving in San Diego, California, on 11 July 1973. After a short period of operations with Submarine Group 5, she moved to Vallejo, California, on 6 August 1973 to begin another overhaul, this time at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard at Vallejo, California. On 30 November 1974, she completed repairs and, following shakedown in January and February 1975, she transited the Panama Canal again in March 1975 to fire test missiles near Cape Canaveral, Florida. She concluded that mission in July and retransited the Canal on 8 August 1975. Thomas A. Edison carried out operations along the United States West Coast until December 1975, at which time she headed for her new home port, Apra, Guam.

On 6 October 1980, Thomas A. Edison completed her final deterrent patrol and was reclassified an attack submarine, given hull number SSN-610. [2] In 1981, in compliance with the SALT I treaty, [ citation needed ] Thomas A. Edison ' s missile section was deactivated. Concrete blocks were placed in the missile tubes, and the missile fire-control system and one of the ship's inertial navigation systems were removed. [3] She was retained primarily for training, ASW antisubmarine warfare exercises, and other secondary duties. [ citation needed ]

In August 1982 Thomas A. Edison conducted the first Western Pacific deployment by an ex-SSBN. During deployment, her crew enjoyed visits to Japan, Korea, Thailand and the Philippines. On 29 November 1982, 40 miles (64 km) east of Subic Bay, Philippines, Thomas A. Edison collided with USS Leftwich (DD-984) while conducting ASW exercises. Thomas A. Edison was at periscope depth preparing to surface. Her sail and sail planes were damaged, but there was no flooding. After the collision the boat never submerged again. She went to Guam for temporary repairs by USS Proteus (AS-19), then made a 35-day transit across the Pacific on the surface to Bremerton, Washington, where she had home ported as an SSN. [ citation needed ]

The original plan [ when? ] for Thomas A. Edison, after some preliminary testing in the Philippines, was for her to become the test platform for the Seal Delivery system, as Thomas A. Edison was in the best material shape of the Ethan Allen-class boats, so she was chosen for this mission. The Navy had planned to decommission the USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608) or USS Sam Houston (SSBN-609), but after the collision it was decided [ by whom? ] to decommission Thomas A. Edison instead. In January 1983, Thomas A. Edison entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for inactivation. [ citation needed ]

Decommissioned on 1 December 1983, Thomas A. Edison was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 30 April 1986. She went through the Navy's Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, beginning on 1 October 1996 and on 1 December 1997 ceased to exist as the recycling was completed.


USS Thomas A. Edison SSBN 610 “Potentia Tenebras Repellendi” (Power to Repel the Darkness)

When I was a young boy going through grade school, I was fascinated with the heroes of the day. There were very few superheroes (Superman and Batman) and I didn’t follow sports as closely as others did. Nope. My heroes were the men who were American Inventors. We learned all about Eli Whitney, Alexander Graham Bell, Fulton and of course one of the most famous of all Thomas A. Edison. I am grateful that I lived in an age when we were taught to look up to the kind of people who actually made a difference in the world.

His personal story of overcoming incredible disadvantages was a real inspiration. It’s not just that he had to deal with family tragedies, it was the added burden of being deprived of part of his hearing. The single biggest lesson was to never quit. Some people say that his greatest invention was his ability to invent. I think he would have made a really good submariner.

This was shared to a Navy web site without attribution but really tells his story well:

Thomas Alva Edison – born on 11 February 1847 in Milan, Ohio – grew up in Michigan. As a child, he was slow in school and very poor in mathematics, but excelled as a reader. Hard work became a characteristic feature of Edison’s life at an early age as a teenager, he had already established a thriving business selling newspapers and candy on trains. In 1863, he became a telegraph operator and, in 1868, went to work for Western Union in Boston, Mass.

Throughout that period, however, he also dabbled with chemistry and the application of electricity to telegraphy. He secured a patent to his first invention, an electrographic vote recorder, in 1869. That same year, Edison joined the Laws Gold Indicator Co. as general manager and soon established a partnership with two others in the electrical engineering consultation business. He sold his portion of the latter firm in 1870, and the profits therefrom allowed him to establish his own shop with a staff of assistants. In 1874, he made quadruplex telegraphy, the simultaneous transmission of four different messages, practicable and, the following year, developed a resonator for analyzing sound waves. In 1876, the year in which he moved his laboratory to Menlo Park, N.J., he perfected the carbon telephone transmitter. In 1877, Edison invented the phonograph – perhaps his greatest achievement from the standpoint of inventive ingenuity.

If one can regard the phonograph as Edison’s greatest invention, the one for which he is best remembered, the incandescent lamp, was not his at all. The principle had been known since Sir Humphry Davy’s experiments in 1802, and inventors had toyed with the idea through the first three quarters of the 19th century, hampered at first by the lack of a satisfactory source of electricity and later by the twin problems of short life and poor luminous output.

Later, in 1883, he made his only truly scientific contribution when he discovered the “Edison effect.” He showed that his incandescent lamp could act as a valve admitting negative electricity but rejecting positive. Ironically, he abandoned the discovery because, as an inventor, he saw no practical use for it. Later, his find became the basis for the vacuum tube so important to the development of radio and television transmission and reception.

Edison moved his laboratory to West Orange, N.J., in 1887. In 1891, he invented a “kinetoscope,” a device for showing photographs in rapid succession to give the illusion of a moving picture. It was not a motion picture projector in the modern sense, for it utilized neither projector nor screen. It remained for Thomas Armat to devise a machine capable of projecting a picture from film onto a screen in 1895. Edison only acquired the patent to Armat’s invention and improved it. He also used the projector in the first commercial showing of motion pictures on 23 April 1896 in New York City. Seventeen years later, he demonstrated a method of synchronizing sound with motion pictures and laid the foundation for sound movies.

The Thomas A. Edison is the first U. S. Navy submarine to carry the name of an inventor—as well as an honorary admiral. For while Thomas Alva Edison invented the electric light bulb, the phonograph, and 1,150 other items, the “Wizard of Menlo Park” also served with the Navy during World War I as a top civilian “officer.” The late Josephus Daniels, then Secretary of the Navy, called Edison to Washington in 1915 to head a group of 22 scientists who comprised the Navy’s first Naval Consulting Board—later to become the Office of Naval Research. Charged with designing new methods and devices to combat the U-boat menace and advising the Navy in scientific matters, the group eventually became known as the Edison Consulting Board. The Edison board’s contributions included surface-ship listening devices designed to detect U-boats and the installation of loudspeaker telephones aboard ship. The most far-reaching accomplishment of the consulting group, however, was in Edison’s convincing Congress to appropriate money for the first Naval laboratory in which scientists could develop weapons for the country’s defense. Built near Washington, D. C., the Naval Research Laboratory has been instrumental in the development of radar and scores of other discoveries vitally important to the country’s defense. *

When World War I erupted, Edison began devoting a large portion of his talent to defense-oriented inventions. He developed substitutes for drugs, dyes, and other items that the United States had previously imported from blockaded Germany. He also worked on a process to make synthetic carbolic acid and other substances necessary for the manufacture of explosives. He headed the Navy’s consultative board and conducted research on such things as torpedo mechanisms, flame throwers, and submarine periscopes. Following the war, he continued his experiments despite his age, looking for improvements in wireless telegraphy, radio, electric power, motion pictures, and even the automobile and airplane. In his eighties, Edison embarked upon the attempt to produce synthetic rubber from domestic American plants. While so engaged, he collapsed in his laboratory on 1 August 1931 and died several weeks later on 18 October.

The Boat

From a 1960’s book on nuclear submarines:

The USS Thomas A. Edison is 410 feet long and displaces 6,900 tons. She is powered by a nuclear reactor and carries equipment unknown a few years ago, such as an inertial navigation system which enables the ship’s position to be determined with pin-point accuracy. Two crews, designated “Blue” and “Gold,” each consisting of about 12 officers and 100 enlisted men, alternately take the ship to sea. An advanced-design Fleet Ballistic Missile submarine, the Thomas A. Edison, is a member of our nation’s prime deterrent force. Her motto “Potentia Tenebras Repellendi” (Power to Repel the Darkness) well summarizes her mission.

The ship is divided into six watertight compartments.

The forward-most compartment, the Torpedo Room, houses the torpedoes and torpedo tubes which provide the ship with a highly effective attack and self-defense capability.

The Operations Compartment contains on the upper level the stations for ship control, navigation, and torpedo fire control.

On the middle level the officers’ and chief petty officers’ living quarters and the crew’s dining and recreation area are located.

The crew’s living area and the Polaris’ fire control equipment occupy the lower level. Aft of the Operations Compartment is the ship’s largest section, the Missile Compartment.

The Missile Compartment houses the sixteen missile tubes with their associated systems and the ship’s stabilization gyroscope.

The three aftermost of the ship’s compartments contain the engineering plant which pro vides the ship’s propulsion, electricity, and other necessary services using energy from the nuclear reactor.

Some of the submarine’s components include 4,500 valves, 4,500 tons of steel, and 130 miles of cable. Optimum utilization of the ship’s deterrent capability dictates operation in sub merged patrols of several months’ duration. During these patrols the ship is completely isolated from the outside environment and completely dependent upon its own facilities for all its needs.

Authorized by Congress: 1958

Built By: General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard in Groton, Connecticut.

“Keel” laid: March 15, 1960. The keel plate was initialed by Peter Edison Sloane, grandson of Thomas A. Edison.

Launched: June 15, 1961. Sponsored by Mrs. John Eyre Sloane, Thomas A. Edison’s daughter.

Commissioned: March 10, 1962

Length: 410 feet Beam: 34 feet

Number of missiles: 16 Polaris A-2s

Nuclear warheads per missile: One

Yield per warhead: 800 kiloton (The yield of the Hiroshima bomb was 16 kilotons and the yield of the Nagasaki bomb was 22 kilotons.)

Missile Range: 1500 nautical miles

Other Armament: Four torpedo tubes forward

Type of propulsion plant: Two steam turbines driving reduction gears to a single shaft.

Crew Members (Blue and Gold Crews): 140 (on each crew)

The USS THOMAS A. EDISON (SSBN-610), an Ethan Allen-class submarine, was commissioned on 10 MAR 1962. Built by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics in Groton, Connecticut, USS THOMAS A. EDISON was involved in a collision with a US destroyer during her shake down training off the East Coast of the US in 1962. THOMAS A. EDISON spent the first four years of her service life sailing on North Atlantic – Arctic Ocean deterrent patrols from Holy Loch, Scotland. USS THOMAS A. EDISON returned to the US for overhaul in 1966-67. After overhaul she served with the Atlantic fleet until June 1973 when her homeport was changed to San Diego, CA. USS THOMAS A. EDISON was overhauled again at Mare Island NSY in 1973-74 and resumed duty with the Pacific Fleet. In December 1975 USS THOMAS A. EDISON changed her homeport to Apra Harbor, Guam. Following shakedown training off the eastern coast of the United States, Thomas A. Edison loaded Polaris missiles at Charleston, S.C., and embarked upon her first deterrent patrol on 7 November. She concluded that patrol at the base at Holy Loch, Scotland, whence she operated for the next four years and 17 deterrent patrols. In September 1966, her official home port was changed from New London, Conn., to Charleston, S.C., in preparation for her first major overhaul. She ended her 17th patrol at Charleston on 15 October 1966 and began her overhaul on the 28th. She completed repairs on 9 May 1968 and, after post-overhaul sea trials and shakedown, she embarked upon her 18th deterrent patrol on 22 September 1968. Over the next five years, she operated out of New London and Rota, Spain, from which ports she conducted another 19 patrols in the Atlantic.

In June of 1973, she was transferred to the Pacific Fleet, arriving in San Diego on 11 July. After a short period of operations with Submarine Group 5, she moved to Vallejo on 6 August to begin another overhaul, this time at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard. On 30 November 1974, the fleet ballistic missile submarine completed repairs and, following shakedown in January and February of 1975, she transited the Panama Canal again in March to fire test missiles near Cape Canaveral, Fla. She concluded that mission in July and retransited the canal on 8 August. Thomas A. Edison carried out operations along the west coast until December at which time she headed for her new home port, Guam. As of the beginning of 1980, the fleet ballistic missile submarine continued to conduct deterrent patrols from her base at Guam.

USS THOMAS A. EDISON served her country for 21 years, 8 months and 21 days, until decommissioned on 1 DEC 1983.

After 18 years of service, the THOMAS A. EDISON was redesignated as SSN 610 to comply with the SALT I treaty on October 6, 1980, and concrete blocks were placed in the missile tubes to disable the submarine’s missile launch capability. She served as an attack submarine (SSN) mainly doing exercises until she was decommissioned on December 1, 1983, and stricken from the Navy list on April 30, 1986.

On October 1, 1996, the THOMAS A. EDISON entered the Navy’s Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., which was completed on December 1, 1997.The hulk of THOMAS A. EDISON was disposed of by Ship and Submarine Recycling Program, Puget Sound NSY, Bremerton, Washington by 1997.

The 2019 Reunion will be 9/23-9/26 2019 in Norfolk according to the USSVI Decklog web site.


Thomas A Edison SSBN-610 - History

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/images/US%20Navy%20Patch%20Submarine%20SSBN%20610%20Thomas%20A%20Edison%20PI.jpg

US Navy Patch USN Submarine SSBN 610 USS Thomas A Edison Polaris SLBM Atlantic Deterrent Patrols 1960s Fully embroidered cut edge 110mm by 95mm four and five sixteenth inches by three and three quarter inches.

USS Thomas A Edison SSBN 610 was launched on 15 June 1961 as the third of five nuclear powered ballistic missile submarines of the Ethan Allen Class which were specifically designed as a ballistic missile launch platform. SSBN 610 was commissioned on 10 March 1962 and was the second US Navy ship of to be named after the inventor Thomas A Edison. USS Thomas A Edison had sixteen tubes for Polaris Submarine launched Ballistic Missiles SLBM and four 21 inch bow torpedo tubes. USS Thomas A Edison adopted the Latin motto Potentia Tenebras Repellendi Power pushes back the darkness. During its construction a Steinway piano was included with the fitting out.

SSBN 610 was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet and to her home port of New London. She collided with the destroyer USS Wadleigh DD 689 during training off the US east coast on 9 April 1962. From USS Thomas A Edison conducting her first deterrent patrol picking up Polaris missiles from Charleston on 7 November 1962 operating in the Atlantic ending the patrol at Holy Loch Scotland. SSBN 610 remained operating from Holy Loch undertaking 17 deterrent patrols before returning to her new home port of Charleston on 15 October 1966 for her first major refit.

The overhaul completed on 9 May 1968 and after sea trials USS Thomas A Edison left for her 18th Atlantic deterrent patrol on 22 September 1968. Following a curtailed 19th patrol SSBN 610 undertook a four missile Follow on Target FOT test launch with warheads removed fired from off the Canary Islands to a target in the Caribbean. The accuracy and timeliness of the successful test launches earnt Blue Crew a Meritorious Unit Citation. Operating from New London and Rota Spain USS Thomas A Edison undertook 19 deterrent patrols in the Mediterranean Sea.

USS Thomas A Edison SSBN 610 was reassigned to the US Pacific Fleet with her homeport changed to San Diego in June 1973 transiting the Panama Canal arriving there on 11 July 1973 joining Submarine Group 5. Shortly after she commenced an overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard at Vallejo Ca on 6 August 1973 which was completed on 30 November 1974. With sea trails in January and February 1975 USS Thomas A Edison transited the Panama Canal in March 1975 to fire test missiles near Cape Canaveral Florida returning via the Panama Canal to San Diego on 8 August 1975. SSBN 610 carried out operations along the West Coast before being assigned a new home port of Apra Guam in December 1975 for deterrent patrols in the middle Pacific.

Strategic Arms Limitation Talks between the US and the Soviet Union during the 1960s and 1970s led to the SALT I anti ballistic missile Treaty of 26 May 1972 which limited nuclear warhead numbers and SALT II 18 June 1979 which began the reduction of nuclear weapons. With the US Navy upgrading its nuclear submarine force the ballistic missile capability of the existing George Washington and Ethan Allen class fleet was decommissioned to allow the introduction of the Ohio class ballistic missile submarines to stay within the limitations of the SALT treaties. USS Thomas A Edison SSBN 610 completed her final deterrent patrol and was redesignated SSN 610 on 6 October 1980 with her ballistic missile tubes disabled converting her to a conventional nuclear powered submarine and retasked for training ASW antisubmarine warfare exercises and other secondary duties

USS Thomas A Edison SSN 610 was decommissioned on 1 December 1983 and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 30 April 1986.


Мы не просто торговая площадка для необычных вещей, мы сообщество людей, которые заботятся о малом бизнесе, людях и нашей планете.

Мы не просто торговая площадка для необычных вещей, мы сообщество людей, которые заботятся о малом бизнесе, людях и нашей планете.

This is a beautifully embroidered hat in Navy Blue, with direct embroidery

"USS THOMAS A. EDISON" and "SSBN - 610" embroidered on the front crown in gold lettering
The Submarine Warfare Insignia (Enlisted Silver Dolphins) embroidered on the front crown (Qualified in Submarines)
Mid profile
6 Panels
Pre-formed bill
Matching under-visor
Matching adjustable velcro closure
Sewn eyelets
Acrylic Twill
Adult size, One size fits most
Embroidered in Pennsylvania

We ship all of our ball caps in a small corrugated box in order to protect the hat in shipment. Other retailers may offer free shipping on their hats, but then stuff the ball cap into an envelope, which may (and usually does) arrive rumpled and/or smashed.

*These hats brought to you by a retired US Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer. I was a Boat Sailor myself (I rode Fast Attacks) and retired as an RMCS(SS).


USS THOMAS A EDISON SSBN-610 Framed Navy Ship Display

This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS THOMAS A EDISON (SSBN-610). The artwork depicts the USS THOMAS A EDISON in all her glory. More than just an artistic concept of the ship, this display includes a custom designed ship crest plaque and an engraved ship statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor.

  • Custom designed and expertly engraved Navy crest positioned on fine black felt
  • Artwork is 16 inches X 7 inches on heavyweight matte
  • Engraved plaque stating the ship vital statistics
  • Enclosed in a high quality 20 inch X 16 inch black frame
  • Choice of matting color options

PLEASE VIEW OUR OTHER GREAT USS THOMAS A EDISON SSBN-610 INFORMATION:
USS Thomas A Edison SSBN-610 Guestbook Forum


He started a cartel

And because Edison ran a company that churned out ideas, he also sought to protect these ideas from competitors. Edison and his company were credited with the invention of the Kinetoscope, an early movie camera, explained Mental Floss. To market his films, Edison joined forces with camera patent holders to create the Motion Picture Patent Company.

This company has a monopoly on all things film. It controlled the distribution, production, and exhibition of movies. So much so that if anyone wanted to make a movie, the company had to be involved. Independent filmmakers had enough of this and moved as far from Edison as possible, to California and to a little known place called Hollywood.

Edison's less than savory practices have somewhat dampened his reputation over time. Yes, the man had a shady side but he was also complicated. Edison was a brilliant genius, a masterful businessman, and also a human being who wanted to leave a legacy.


Watch the video: Thomas Edison, Inventor: 1st Grade Unit 5 Week 3